McCurdy Group - Insurance and Financial Consultants

Thursday, January 31, 2019

Common Cold Weather Insurance Claims: Part Two

Hail
Hail can do serious damage to your roof, siding, porch, and automobile.In 2014, State Farm alone had $2.4 billion in damages caused by wind and hail, according to III.
You can’t prevent hail, but you can prepare for it:
  • Inspect your roof and siding every autumn. Repair loose or missing tiles.
  • If you live in an area where hail is common, you can consider installing hail-resistant asphalt shingles. This precaution could even help lower your insurance premium.
  • Never drive during a hailstorm. If you get caught in a storm, park at a nearby gas station underneath the awning. If that’s not possible, pull over and get in the back seat of the car away from the windshield, which could shatter.
Like wind, some homeowners’ policies have hail exclusion. Check with your insurance agent to make sure you’re covered. Discuss the different sorts of claims process and coverage lines with regards to hail. For your auto insurance, you’ll want to have comprehensive insurance, which will repair your car from “acts of God” like hail, falling icicles, or icy branches.

Frozen pipes

If your pipes get too cold, the water inside them will freeze. This ice can expand and burst the pipes, leading to water loss and water damage in your home. A study by Disaster Safety found that frozen pipes resulted in losses of around $10,000, which is twice as severe as other sorts of plumbing failures. Freezing pipes accounts for 18% of all water damage claims. Damages from frozen pipes can include flooding, ceiling collapse, damaged floors and walls, mold, and more. 
Interestingly, insurance companies often consider frozen pipes a “preventable problem.” They may say that your negligence caused the damage. This means that you could be stuck with a $10,000 water damage bill without your insurance company stepping in.
Thus, it’s crucial to protect your home against frozen pipe damage:
  • Drain and disconnect all hoses.
  • Drain the sprinkler supply lines.
  • Keep your home warm at a minimum of 65 degrees.
  • Insulate pipes in unheated spaces, like basements, garages, and attics. You can use pipe sleeves or heat tape.
  • Leave garage doors closed.
  • If you have a swimming pool, run the pump during nights where temperatures are expected to go below freezing.
  • When it’s especially cold outside, let cool water drip from your faucets. This will keep your water flowing, so they have less chance of freezing in the pipes. 
  • Know where your water is shut off. If your pipes do burst, the first step is to turn off the water to reduce any further damage.
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